Particulate air pollutants, APOE alleles and their contributions to cognitive impairment in older women and to amyloidogenesis in experimental models

31 Jan 2017M Cacciottolo1, X Wang2, I Driscoll3, N Woodward1, A Saffari4, J Reyes5, M L Serre5, W Vizuete5, C Sioutas4, T E Morgan1, M Gatz6,7, H C Chui7,8, S A Shumaker9, S M Resnick10, M A Espeland11, C E Finch1,7 and J C Chen2,7

Compared with women who lived in areas exposed to low PM2.5 levels, those who resided in areas with high PM2.5 levels - defined as levels that that exceeded the EPA's permissible limit in 2012 (35 micrograms per cubic meter of air) - were found to be at an 81 percent greater risk of global cognitive decline and have a 92 percent increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

Cross-section study
3 effects
3647 subjects

Reported Outcomes

CausesOutcomeCertainty

PM25 Outdoor Air Pollution Contaminant risk & protective factor

Cognitive deficit Brain outcome
Increased risk of Cognitive deficit
Brain system

High evidence
81.0%

PM25 Outdoor Air Pollution Contaminant risk & protective factor

Alzheimer's disease Brain outcome
Increased risk of Alzheimer's disease
Brain system

High evidence
92.0%

PM25 Outdoor Air Pollution Contaminant risk & protective factor

Dementia Brain outcome
Increased risk of Dementia
Brain system

High evidence
92.0%