Impact of Atrial Fibrillation on the Risk of Death The Framingham Heart Study

08 Sep 1998Emelia J. Benjamin, Philip A. Wolf, Ralph B. D’Agostino, Halit Silbershatz, William B. Kannel, Daniel Levy

In subjects from the original cohort of the Framingham Heart Study, Atrial fibrillation (AF) was associated with a 1.5- to 1.9-fold mortality risk after adjustment for the preexisting cardiovascular conditions with which AF was related. The decreased survival seen with AF was present in men and women and across a wide range of ages.

Cohort Study
5 effects
40 years
5209 subjects

Reported Outcomes

DeterminantsOutcomeDetails

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular outcome
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiovascular system

Mortality Musculoskeletal outcome
Increased risk of Mortality
Musculoskeletal system

High evidence
50.0%

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular outcome
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiovascular system

Anxiety Brain outcome
Minor increase risk of Anxiety
Brain system

Low evidence
66.0%

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular outcome
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiovascular system

Mortality Musculoskeletal outcome
Increased risk of Mortality
Musculoskeletal system

High evidence
90.0%

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular outcome
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiovascular system

Fatigue Musculoskeletal outcome
Minor increase risk of Fatigue
Musculoskeletal system

Low evidence
66.0%

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular outcome
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiovascular system

Stroke Brain outcome
Minor increase risk of Stroke
Brain system

Low evidence
25.0%