Does Mode of Contact with Different Types of Social Relationships Predict Depression in Older Adults? Evidence from a Nationally Representative Survey

06 Oct 2015Alan R. Teo MD, MS, HwaJung Choi PhD, Sarah B. Andrea MPH, Marcia Valenstein MD, MS, Jason T. Newsom PhD, Steven K. Dobscha MD, Kara Zivin PhD

Frequency of in-person social contact with friends and family independently predicts risk of subsequent depression in older adults. Clinicians should consider encouraging face-to-face social interactions as a preventive strategy for depression.

Cohort Study
2 effects
2 years
11065 subjects

Reported Outcomes

CausesOutcomeCertainty

Social Support Selfcare risk & protective factor

Depression Brain outcome
Strong decrease risk of Depression
Brain system

High evidence
-100.0%

Friendships Selfcare risk & protective factor
Friendships
Selfcare

Depression Brain outcome
Strong decrease risk of Depression
Brain system

High evidence
-100.0%