Visceral adiposity and metabolic syndrome after very high–fat and low-fat isocaloric diets: a randomized controlled trial

30 Nov 2016Vivian L Veum, Johnny Laupsa-Borge, Øyvin Eng, Espen Rostrup, Terje H Larsen, Jan Erik Nordrehaug, Ottar K Nygård, Jørn V Sagen, Oddrun A Gudbrandsen, Simon N Dankel, and Gunnar Mellgren

Consuming energy primarily as carbohydrate or fat for 3 mo did not differentially influence visceral fat and metabolic syndrome in a low-processed, lower-glycemic dietary context. Our data do not support the idea that dietary fat per se promotes ectopic adiposity and cardiometabolic syndrome in humans.

Cohort Study
5 effects
12 weeks
46 subjects

Reported Outcomes

DeterminantsOutcomeDetails

Ketogenic diet Nutrition risk & protective factor
Minor Protective Factor Ketogenic diet
Nutrition

Fat Oxidation Musculoskeletal outcome
Minor increase risk of Fat Oxidation
Musculoskeletal system

Moderate evidence
8.0%

Ketogenic diet Nutrition risk & protective factor
Minor Risk Factor Ketogenic diet
Nutrition

Insulin Resistance Lymphatic outcome
Minor increase risk of Insulin Resistance
Lymphatic system

Moderate evidence
5.0%

Ketogenic diet Nutrition risk & protective factor
Minor Risk Factor Ketogenic diet
Nutrition

Insulin Resistance Lymphatic outcome
Minor increase risk of Insulin Resistance
Lymphatic system

Moderate evidence
5.0%

Ketogenic diet Nutrition risk & protective factor
Minor Protective Factor Ketogenic diet
Nutrition

Obesity Musculoskeletal outcome
Minor decreased risk of Obesity
Musculoskeletal system

Moderate evidence
-22.0%

Ketogenic diet Nutrition risk & protective factor
Minor Protective Factor Ketogenic diet
Nutrition

Visceral fat Digestive outcome
Minor decreased risk of Visceral fat
Digestive system

Moderate evidence
-22.0%