Relative and Absolute Excess Risks of Coronary Heart Disease among Women Who Smoke Cigarettes

16 Nov 1987Walter C. Willett, M.D., Adele Green, M.D., Meir J. Stampfer, M.D., Frank E. Speizer, M.D., Graham A. Colditz, M.B., B.S., Bernard Rosner, Ph.D., Richard R. Monson, M.D., William Stason, M.D., and Charles H. Hennekens, M.D.

The number of cigarettes smoked per day was positively associated with the risk of fatal coronary heart disease (relative risk = 5.5 for ≥25 cigarettes per day), nonfatal myocardial infarction (relative risk = 5.8), and angina pectoris (relative risk = 2.6). Even smoking 1 to 4 or 5 to 14 cigarettes per day was associated with a twofold to threefold increase in the risk of fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal infarction. Overall, cigarette smoking accounted for approximately half these events. The attributable (absolute excess) risk of coronary heart disease due to current smoking was highest among women who were already at increased risk because of older age, a parental history of myocardial infarction, a higher relative weight, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, or diabetes. In contrast, former smokers had little, if any, increase in risk.

Cohort Study
2 effects
1976 to 1982
119404 subjects

Reported Outcomes

VariablesOutcomeEffectLatency

Smoking Contaminant risk & protective factor
Smoking
Contaminant

Heart Attack (Myocardial infarction - ACS) Cardiovascular outcome
Heart Attack (M...
Cardiovascular

Strong Increase

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Smoking Contaminant risk & protective factor
Smoking
Contaminant

Coronary Heart Disease (Ischaemic Heart Disease) Cardiovascular outcome
Coronary Heart ...
Cardiovascular

Strong Increase

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